This site is intended for US healthcare professionals only.

    Dif‌fuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL) is the most common type of non-Hodgkin lymphoma (NHL), a cancer of the immune system1

    22%-30%

    of all newly diagnosed cases of NHL1,2

    Graphic showing all newly diagnosed cases of non-Hodgkin lymphoma
    <30K new cases

    in the United States in 20163

    Graphic showing the number of newly diagnosed cases of non-Hodgkin lymphoma in the united states in 2016

    Most frequently diagnosed in ages

    median age: 
    66 years4
    65-74
    Graphic showing the median age of newly diagnosed patients from 2013 to 2017 46% <65 years of age
    54% ≥65 years of age

    Data from 2013-2017

    DLBCL is an aggressive cancer that affects B‑lymphocytes1

    A significant number of patients relapse after first-line treatment5

    Graphic showing the percent of patients who are not cured with first-line treatment

    Outcomes are poor in patients who relapse after ≥2 treatments6,7

    Chart showing overall survival rate data for  patients with RR DLBCL who relapse after two or more treatments Chart showing overall survival rate data for  patients with RR DLBCL who relapse after two or more treatments
    There is no established standard of care for patients who have received ≥2 lines of therapy7

    Treatment rates decline with each relapse, and therapeutic options become limited7-13

    Graphic showing an estimated number of first-line, second-line, third-line, and fourth or more line patients treated in 2019 Graphic showing an estimated number of first-line, second-line, third-line, and fourth or more line patients treated in 2019

    Although new developments in RR DLBCL have emerged in recent years, there are still several hurdles that limit treatment options, including7,9-13:

    • Toxicity from prior treatments, such as chemotherapy
    • Comorbidities
    • Refractory status
    • Treatment eligibility
    • Logistical barriers
    An effective treatment option is needed for patients
    with RR DLBCL who have received ≥2 lines of therapy9,14,15

    References: 1. Lymphoma Research Foundation. https://www.lymphoma.org/aboutlymphoma/nhl/dlbcl. Accessed March 23, 2020. 2. Purdum A, et al. The Oncologist. 2019;24:1229-1236. 3. Teras L, et al. CA Cancer J Clin. 2016;66(6):443-459. 4. National Cancer Institute. https://seer.cancer.gov/statfacts/html/dlbcl.html. Accessed March 23, 2020. 5. Elstrom R, et al. Clin Lymphoma Myeloma Leuk. 2010;10(3):192-196. 6. Crump M, et al. Blood. 2017;130(16):1800-1808. 7. Morrison VA, et al. Future Oncol. 2019;15(9):1021-1034. 8. Data on file. Karyopharm Therapeutics Inc. 9. Nowakowski GS, et al. J Natl Cancer Inst. 2016;108(12):djw257. 10. Liu Y, et al. Am J Hematol. 2019;94(5):604-616. 11. Chao MP. Cancer Manag Res. 2013;5:251-269. 12. Pfreundschuh M. Blood. 2010;116(24):5103-5110. 13. van der Poel MWM, et al. Ann Hematol. 2015;94(8):1373-1379. 14. Friedberg JW. Hematology Am Soc Hematol Educ Program. 2011;2011:498-505. 15. Reddy NM, et al. Ann Oncol. 2017;28(11):2680-2690.

    INDICATIONS

    • XPOVIO® (selinexor) in combination with dexamethasone is indicated for the treatment of adult patients with relapsed or refractory multiple myeloma who have received at least 4 prior therapies and whose disease is refractory to at least 2 proteasome inhibitors, at least 2 immunomodulatory agents, and an anti-CD38 monoclonal antibody.
    • XPOVIO is indicated for the treatment of adult patients with relapsed or refractory diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL), not otherwise specified, including DLBCL arising from follicular lymphoma, after at least 2 lines of systemic therapy.

    IMPORTANT SAFETY INFORMATION

    Thrombocytopenia: XPOVIO can cause life-threatening thrombocytopenia, potentially leading to hemorrhage. Thrombocytopenia was reported in patients with multiple myeloma (MM) and developed or worsened in patients with DLBCL.

    Thrombocytopenia is the leading cause of dosage modifications. Monitor platelet counts at baseline and throughout treatment. Monitor more frequently during the first 3 months of treatment. Institute platelet transfusion and/or other treatments as clinically indicated. Monitor patients for signs and symptoms of bleeding and evaluate promptly. Interrupt, reduce dose, or permanently discontinue based on severity of adverse reaction.